Baby Boomer Retirement Planning Tips

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Baby boomer retirement planning tips

In 2015 the youngest baby boomers will be turning 50.

It doesn’t matter if you’re a 50-year old baby boomer or a 65-year old baby boomer – it’s time to start planning for your retirement now!

Here are our top 3 baby boomer retirement planning tips:

1 Work out how much money you will need

Baby boomers can feel stress around planning for retirement because they haven’t had superannuation throughout their entire working life. And with the recent global financial crisis, some baby boomers are still feeling the after shocks to their investment portfolios.

An important part of baby boomer retirement planning is to work out how much you need to draw down to live the life you and your family want.

Working out a budget well before you retire and trialling it while you’re still earning employment income, can be a great way to test out what you’re comfortable with.

As part of this budget, make sure you include incidentals that make life more enjoyable like:

  • A couple of nice bottles of wine a week
  • Trips to the movies and shows, and
  • Unexpected utilities bills.

Thinking that the age pension will help you out?

In the next 20 years, there are plans for the age for the pension to be lifted to 70 years of age. This plan is set to affect baby boomers who have just turned 50.

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2 What lifestyle do you want?

The retirement images we’re fed by the media include grey nomads travelling around Australia, couples holidaying on river cruises and lazy afternoons having wine with friends.

But before you decide to retire, it’s important to sit down with your partner or spouse and work out what lifestyle you both want.

Consider the following:

  • Where would you like to live?
  • How often would you like to travel, and where?
  • What medical costs and health expenses do you need to plan for?
  • How much income per year do you need to maintain a comfortable lifestyle?

Going through these types of questions is challenging, but we can help you out in a complimentary meeting.

Contact us here.

3 Do you need to retire or only semi-retire?

With the average life expectancy in Australia now around 85 years of age, if you fully retire at 65 you may have 20 years (or longer!) to support yourself without an employment income.

So before you tender your resignation and line up for your gold watch, why not consider working part-time for a few more years?

We know some people in their late 60’s and early 70’s who use their long service leave and go on an extended holiday overseas. And some employers are keen to see their most experienced workers stay in the work force on a part time basis.

Before you set your retirement plans in place, remember to seek advice. Everyone’s retirement plan needs to suit their lifestyle needs and priorities.

 

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.

 

Estate Planning For Generation X

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Estate planning for Generation X

Why consider estate planning when you’re in your 40’s?

After all, you’re a busy Generation X with work and family commitments – it can feel hard enough getting your tax done every year!

If you’re a member of Generation X, estate planning won’t always be top of mind.

But life goes by fast and planning for your family and partner when you’re not here is important.

Here are 3 things to focus on.

1 Life insurance

Seen a lot of ads on TV urging you to take out life insurance to protect your family when ‘you’re no longer around’?

Before you take out separate life insurance, make sure you find out from your superannuation fund what level of cover you’ve got.

Once you’ve got this figured out, it’s time to sit down and look at your assets and liabilities.

Now, here’s the hard question to ask – and one of the reasons why many people put off thinking about estate planning!

Would the amount you’re covered for pay off your liabilities and provide a safe financial future for your family?

We know it’s hard to think about worst-case scenarios, but estate planning is an important part of planning for the future.

We’d love to help you figure this out, contact us here.

HHG Foohills

2 Make or update your Will

Having a clearly written, legal, up to date Will sorted out is important.

Your Will is a legal document that indicates how you’d like your assets distributed after your death.

It also includes the person (or organisation) you have given responsibility to for carrying out the wishes noted down in your Will.

Making sure you have a Will ensures that:

  • Disagreements can be eliminated among people who expected to benefit from your estate,
  • It’s clear who will be guardians of any minor children you may have,
  • Your assets are divided according to your wishes,
  • Your family and executors are clear about how you’d like your affairs managed, and
  • Your estate is settled quickly.

Dying without a will can result in your estate taking a longer time to settle than if you have one.

It can also lead to confusion about whom will manage your estate and family disagreements about asset distribution.

3 Organise an enduring power of attorney

As a Generation X you’ve probably got some elderly relatives who have organised powers of attorney.

But what is a power of attorney and why should you organise one?

An enduring Power of Attorney is a legal document that allows you to appoint a person (or persons) of your choice to manage your financial affairs and assets if you’re not able to do so (e.g. if you’re ill, overseas or in an accident).

A medical Power of Attorney is a legal document that allows you to appoint someone to make medical treatment decisions on your behalf if you become physically or mentally incapable of doing so for yourself.

Each Australian state has their own laws – here’s the link to Victoria’s.

Like some help getting your head around estate planning? Call us on 1300 296 388

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.

 

5 Essential First Home Buyer Tips

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5 Essential First Home Buyer Tips

With interest rates in Australia at record lows, you may be thinking about buying your first home.

But before you start attending open for inspections and auctions, here are 5 things to consider. 

 

1 Do your research before you start looking for your home

You may have heard that the most important thing in real estate is “location, location, location!”

So before you start your house search, sit down and work out where you’d like to live and for how long.

Think about things like:

  • When you’d like to start a family. If it’s in the next few years, your home will need to be big enough, but also be close to childcare centres, parks and schools.
  • How long you’re willing to drive or commute to work?
  • How many shops, cafes and restaurants would you like to be close to?
  • Would you like to be able to walk to the local parks?

HHG Financial

2 Get clear about the real costs of buying your first home

When you’re buying your first home, you may not be aware there are extra costs to consider. If you’ve got $60,000 deposit saved and you’re looking for a house that’s around $660,000, you may think that a $600,000 mortgage will be enough.

Here are some extra things you need to budget for that will increase the costs when buying your home:

  • Building inspection reports
  • Owner’s corporation costs (if you’re buying an apartment or unit)
  • Bank valuation fees
  • Transfer and mortgage fees
  • Conveyancing and legal costs,
  • Stamp duty (varies from state to state with first home buyer rules), and
  • Mortgage insurance

Also consider making a budget for renovations that may need to be done before you move in.

Get quotes for changing locks, floor sanding, new carpets, new curtains and security doors and window screens.

 

3 Before you get a mortgage, set up a mortgage payment plan

If you’re thinking about buying your first home, you’ve probably been saving for a deposit. Setting aside money regularly into a savings account is good practice for making mortgage payments.

But are you saving enough each week or fortnight to replicate what your mortgage payments would be?

Sitting down and estimating how much your mortgage payments will be and then aiming to save this amount, will help you track whether you can afford this size mortgage.

 

4 Take your time – never get pressured

Buying your first home will be the biggest investment you’ve ever made – so make sure you never get rushed into something that doesn’t feel right for you.

Don’t ever feel pressured by estate agents to make an offer before someone else does.

Every day in Australia, there are new properties listed for sale, so don’t feel like you’re going to miss out!

 

5 Get financial advice

Before you buy your first home consider making an appointment with a financial advisor and planner.

They will be able to help you with budgets, give you advice on what you can afford and what type of mortgage you should consider.

We’d love to help you, contact us here for a complimentary chat.

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.

 

 

5 Things You Must Know About Your BAS

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5 things you must know about your BAS

Do you run a business in Australia and feel confused or overwhelmed with your taxation obligations?

Here are 5 things you need to know about your business activity statement (BAS).

1 What is a BAS?

A business activity statement (BAS) is a form that’s submitted to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) by all businesses that are registered for GST.

It accounts for:

  • PAYG withheld from employees
  • The difference between GST collected (for customers and clients) and GST your business has paid (to suppliers), and
  • When required, is an advance on your PAYG income tax.

HHG Foothills

 

2 When are the due dates for lodging and paying your BAS?

The due date for lodging and paying will be displayed on your BAS. If the due date falls on a weekend or public holiday, you may lodge your BAS return and pay on the next business day.

Monthly reporting:

If you report monthly, the due date for your monthly BAS is usually on the 21st day of the following month.

Quarterly reporting:

The table below has the reporting dates. If you lodge your BAS return online, you are given more time for three quarters of the year.

Quarter Due date – paper Due date – online
1 – July, August and September 28 October 11 November
2 – October, November and December 28 February 28 February
3 – January, February and March 28 April 12 May
4 – April, May and June 28 July 11 August

 

3 What if I can’t pay my BAS on time?

Always lodge on time, even if you can’t pay on time. As soon as you know you can’t pay your BAS on time, call the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) on 13 11 42 to discuss payment options.

 

4 I’ve just registered for GST, what do I do next?

We give all our clients these simple three tips below:

  1. Open up a separate bank account for your business and process all income and expenses through this account. This makes it easy to identify what you’ve been earning and spending in your business.
  2. Identify what book keeping system you want to use. It can be as simple as an Excel spread sheet or online software like MYOB or Xero.
  3. Set aside a set amount each week for your BAS payment. Some of our clients set up separate business savings accounts and deposit a regular amount into this every week. This simple step gives them peace of mind, as they know that they can easily pay their BAS on time.

 

5 Is there someone who can help me with my BAS?

Yes! A BAS agent or Tax agent can help you complete and lodge your BAS statement.

When you’re looking for help make sure they:

  • Will be able to help you maximise your deductions,
  • Know all the ATO requirements,
  • Have experience and can answer any questions you’ve got, and
  • They have the staff and time to take on a new client.

With over 30 years experience as registered tax agent’s, we help hundreds of businesses at BAS time to complete their return and file it on time.

Contact us here and chat to us about we can help you with your BAS.

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.

 

5 Steps To Get Credit Card Debt Under Control

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5 steps to get your credit card debt under control

Has your credit card statement arrived with your Christmas purchases on it?

It can be quite a shock when you finally open the envelope from your bank and notice how much you spent on presents, entertainment and holidays!

Here are 5 things to consider so your credit card debt doesn’t feel like a burden.

1 Find out how much you owe on all your credit cards

Sit down with your credit card statements and write down a summary that includes the:

  • Monthly payment
  • Interest
  • Creditor
  • Balance due
  • Credit limit, and
  • Due date for each credit card.

This can feel daunting to do, but knowledge is power – you need to know how much credit card debt you’ve got before you can improve your situation.

HHG Financial

2 Contact your bank

Interest rates are at record lows in Australia now and banks are keen for your business. Make a call to your bank to see if you can negotiate a lower interest rate.

A lower interest rate will mean that you can pay off your credit card balance quicker.

3 Consolidate your debt

If you’ve got multiple credit cards, you may like to consider consolidating all your debt into a personal loan, into your mortgage or transferring the balances into a lower rate card.

Combining your debt into a personal loan will mean that at the end of the loan period, your debt will be cleared. The interest rate may be around 7 to 14 per cent but this rate will still be lower than your credit card interest rate.

If you combine your credit cards into your mortgage you need to be disciplined about making extra payments each fortnight or month.

Paying the same mortgage amount won’t clear your debt.

Transferring your credit card balances to a lower rate credit card is appealing to some people as some banks offer an interest free term.

To make this option work, it’s important that you take advantage of the interest free period by setting up a repayment plan and sticking to it.

4 Change your spending habits

To change your financial situation, you will need to change the way you spend. Instead of swiping your credit card with purchases, consider taking cash out of your account each week and use this for your daily expenses like grocery shopping and transport costs.

Having to part with a set amount of cash each week can help rein in your spending tendencies.

5 Get some advice

Your credit card debt didn’t just appear overnight – it’s been accumulating over time.

And if you know you’re going to miss a payment, contact your bank and let them know.

If you’re not sure what to do first, it’s a good idea to get some independent financial advice.

Need some help?

We offer a complimentary chat – contact us here.

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.

 

Has The Block 2015 Inspired You To Renovate For Profit?

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Has The Block 2015 made you consider renovating?

The Block reality TV show has returned for 2015.

Millions of Australians will watch couples renovate apartments over a tight time frame to hopefully achieve a huge profit.

But before you rush into buying a ‘renovators delight’ in the hope that your financial future will be secure, consider these 5 tips.

1 Do your research

Investing in property (with the view to renovate) need to be done with a clear head and with as much information as possible.

Sit down with your financial adviser and get some objective advice about what you want to do and how this fits into your long term financial plan.

Details to consider before you buy include what types of people will want to live in your home. Will it be families, semi retired or mainly professionals with no children?

This will impact on the type of renovation you do.

HHG Foothills

2 Keep your renovation simple

Renovating an investment property is different to renovating your own home. You may love stone kitchen bench tops but this choice in an investment property will add thousands of dollars to your renovation. To save money but for the same look, you’d choose a laminate bench top.

Leaving your own tastes and preferences out of the renovation can feel challenging. If in doubt, always go for neutral, simple choices. 

3 Don’t go overboard

Be inspired by The Block, but don’t replicate everything they do! Instead of moving walls, making windows bigger and adding on rooms, go for the low cost improvements that can add value. 

Simple improvements that add value to your property include:

  • Freshly painted white walls,
  • Plain window furnishings,
  • Polished floorboards,
  • Neutral tiles, and
  • New light fittings

4 Get competent and professional trades people

If you’re inspired by The Block 2015 to get in and do some renovating yourself, go for it! But there will be trades people you need to hire including:

  • Builders,
  • Electricians, and
  • Plumbers.

A professional builder will be able to guide you through the renovation maze and help you out with hidden problems like asbestos removal. And they’ll have their own contacts you may want to use.

5 Freshen up the outside

When you’re budgeting for your renovation, make sure you save some money for exterior.

Things to budget for include:

  • Roof and gutters
  • Exterior painting
  • Rendering of brick work
  • Landscaping of garden, and
  • A new letterbox.

Renovating an investment property can be challenging and almost always goes over budget. So before you dive in and take up the challenge, make sure your finances are in good order. 

Like some financial advice before you renovate? Click here to book in for a complimentary chat!

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.

 

Four Ways To Save Money In 2015

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Four ways to save money in 2015

If one of your financial goals in 2015 is to save money, have you worked out how you’re going to do it?

Here are four ways to save money in 2015 so your financial future looks brighter. 

1 Set realistic saving goals

On New Year’s Day you may feel excited and upbeat about your resolution to save more money, but by early February the euphoria has worn off.

One way to avoid sabotaging your financial goals is to set small, realistic saving goals.

If your overall financial goal is to save $10,000 by December 2015, chunk this down into a monthly goal of $800, then a weekly goal of $200.

Having a clear weekly goal written in your diary each week, will keep you on track. And it will help you keep focused!

Knowing that you want to save $200 a week will help you avoid spending money on things you want, but don’t necessarily need.

financial planners lilydale

2 Check all your insurances

If you’ve got a direct debit set up for your bills, you may not have looked at your insurance bills in great detail lately.

Set aside half an hour or so and look at all your insurance bills: from health cover, car and home insurance to income insurance.

As you look at what you’re paying, check that the insurance is covering your current needs and requirements.

For instance, if you’ve completed your family and still have maternity cover in your health insurance plan, consider changing plans.

Maybe you had a pay rise last year and your income insurance only reflects your old salary, consider changing your level of insurance.

3 Examine your monthly expenses

Look at your most recent personal bank account statement and consider what you’ve spent money on.

For example:

  • Did you really need to buy four albums through iTunes at $20 each, two of which you really don’t like anyway?
  • Were you charged extra for data usage on your mobile bill – if so, could you monitor your usage and cut back?
  • Did you have to buy the two outfits from the online clothes store, when you only really wanted to buy one?

You may notice that the small amounts all add up to a few hundred dollars of potential savings a month!

4 Use the competitive market to save money

Interest rates have fallen in the last few years, so it makes sense to look at all your loans and check if you’re paying too much.

A monthly difference between a $500,000 standard variable loan (25 years) at 4.7% and the same loan at 5.7% is around $300 a month or $3,500 a year.

Next look at your credit card interest rate.

If it’s around 18% and has a large balance, consider talking to your bank about refinancing your credit card and even consolidating the balance outstanding into your mortgage.

Need help with your financial savings plan? Our first consultation is FREE!

We’d love to chat with you and help you achieve your 2015 financial goals.

Click here to make an appointment.

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.

 

3 steps to build your financial future

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3 steps to build your financial future

Have you noticed that as you get older, the years seem to go by faster and faster?

You get invited to your best friend’s 40th birthday party, when it just seemed like yesterday that you were in university!

It doesn’t matter if you’re a Generation X, a Generation Y or a Baby Boomer, it’s important to set goals for your financial future now.

financial planner lilydale

Here are 3 things to focus on as you build your financial future 

1 Examine your personal situation

It’s a good idea to examine your personal financial situation a few times a year.

Everyone’s circumstances will change depending on where they are in their life:

  • Generation Y – pay off any outstanding student loans; once you’ve done this, it’s time to start saving for a house deposit.
  • Generation X – if you’re raising children, this can feel like an impediment to saving money. We can help you figure out how to save money each week (link to page)
  • Baby Boomers – if you’ve paid off your mortgage and the kids are off your hands, you’ll be eyeing off what life will be like when you’re no longer working.

 

2 Start saving a little more

Saving a little more each week doesn’t mean that you have to start eating 2-minute noodles for dinner!

It can be as simple as starting a savings account that has a regular amount of your salary transferred into each pay.

Start with $100 a pay and pretty soon, through the power of compound interest, you’ll have a healthy looking savings account!

Another way to save more money is to make extra contributions to your superannuation account.

One of the main benefits of having a salary sacrifice arrangement is that your extra contributions are taxed at a lower rate (the superannuation tax rate of 15%) than your marginal tax rate (which can be up to 47%).

And as you’re saving more for your retirement, you accumulate more superannuation!

 

3 Look after your health and wellbeing

High health care costs can destroy a lot of retirement plans.

Sure, there will be unexpected illnesses and accidents. But looking after your physical health now can help reduce the likelihood that your health care costs will blow your budget.

Look at your current health objectively and ask yourself, “Would I feel better and have more energy if I lost some weight and exercised more?

If you haven’t been to your doctor for a full medical check, make an appointment.

Investing in your health and wellbeing now will be worth it in the future.

Taking some time to consider your financial situation now will help you feel more confident about your financial future.

We’d love to help you out and offer a FREE consultation to help you get back on track.

Contact us here.

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.

New Year Financial Resolutions 2015

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New Year Financial resolutions 2015 – Part 2

Part 1 of our New Year financial resolutions list included:

  1. New year financial resolution 1 – Set a long-term financial goal
  2. New year financial resolution 2 – Look after your financial health
  3. New year financial resolution 3 – Sort out your superannuation
  4. New year financial resolution 4 – Cut out wasteful spending
  5. New year financial resolution 5 – Set short-term financial goals

Missed part one? Click here to read it.

financial planner lilydale

Here are 5 more New Year financial resolutions to consider for 2015

New year financial resolution 6 – prepare for retirement

It doesn’t matter if retirement is in a few years or a decade or two; it’s never too early to plan for how you would like to retire.

Coming to grips with planning for retirement doesn’t have to be complicated or overwhelming. 

Our financial planners can help you with your retirement planning.

Contact us here for a complimentary chat.

 

New year financial resolution 7 – check your insurance cover

When was the last time you checked your insurance coverage?

There are a lot of insurances to consider from health insurance, to life insurance and income insurance and your home and car insurances.

Checking your insurances every year is important so you can feel confident that you and your family’s needs are covered.

 

New year financial resolution 8 – Update your estate planning documents

Are you a Generation X or Y and think that estate planning is only for ‘oldies’?

Or maybe you think you haven’t got enough money to even bother about it all!

Estate planning isn’t all about dividing your assets when you’re no longer here and avoiding taxes.

It also includes looking at the beneficiaries you’ve nominated in your superannuation account.

 

New year financial resolution 9 – Create an emergency fund

Do you have a bank account that’s got between 3 and 6 months worth of necessary living expenses in it?

If you’re like most Generation X, Generation Y and baby boomers you haven’t – but it’s not hard to start one in 2015.

You may be thinking, “Why bother?”

What if you’re injured at work and even with income insurance you don’t have enough money to sustain the lifestyle you’re used to?

An account with a few months of living expenses in it can give you peace of mind and if you never have to access it? You could consider adding it to your retirement fund!

 

New year financial resolution 10 – Get financial advice

There’s lot of ways to get financial education now. From online research to talking to your friends at the next BBQ you attend.

But as the saying goes, “you get what you pay for…”

Creating a plan for your financial future doesn’t have to be overwhelming or stressful.

Sitting down with a financial planner who takes the time to understand your lifestyle goals and circumstances can help you live the life you dream about.

Our financial planners in Lilydale, Melbourne’s eastern suburbs would love to help you fulfil your New Years financial resolutions.

 

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.

 

New Year Financial Resolutions 2015

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New Year Financial resolutions 2015 – Part 1

It’s usual at the start of each New Year to sit down and make resolutions.

Typical New Year resolutions include losing weight, eating healthier and starting an exercise program.

But have you thought about what New Year financial resolutions you have for 2015?

To help you out, we’ve put together a list of 10 New Year financial resolutions for 2015.

New year financial resolution 1 – Set a long-term financial goal

Whether you’re a Generation X, Generation Y or a baby boomer, setting financial goals for the year ahead can help you achieve the lifestyle you want. 

When you’re setting your goals, consider where you’d like to be at the end of the 2015.

Long-term financial goals can include:

  • Saving a deposit for a house, and
  • Starting an investment portfolio.

Financial Planner Lilydale

New year financial resolution 2 – Look after your financial health

You may have a rough idea of what you owe on the mortgage and how much you have in your superannuation fund, but when was the last time you took a good look at your financial health?

Making the time to see a financial planner will help you understand:

  • Where you’re spending money and where you can save money,
  • What investments are giving you the returns you want, and
  • Whether you’ve got the right level of insurance for your life circumstances.

 

New year financial resolution 3 – Sort out your superannuation

Do you have more than one superannuation fund?

If you’re like most Australians, you probably do!

It can seem like a chore to get your superannuation sorted out, but we can help you:

  • Find your lost superannuation, and
  • Consolidate your superannuation into one fund.

It’s also a good idea to think about contributing a little bit more to your superannuation in 2015.

Adding more to your superannuation now means you’ll have more when you retire!

 

New year financial resolution 4 – Cut out wasteful spending

Have you ever looked at your bank statements and wondered how you could have spent so much money?

Taking the time to sit down and look at your bank statement will show you where you’ve wasted money.

Common areas of wasteful spending include buying:

  • Lottery tickets,
  • Lunch everyday,
  • Too many fruit and vegetables that end up going bad,
  • Magazine subscriptions that you don’t read, and
  • Clothes you don’t end up wearing.

 

New year financial resolution 5 – Set short-term financial goals

Having good financial health doesn’t mean that you can’t enjoy your life now!

After all, if you can’t have fun now, you won’t be motivated to stay on track and achieve your long-term financial goals.

Short-term financial goals like saving for a holiday to have at end of 2015 can also be used as a reward for sticking with your New Year financial resolutions!

We’d love to help you out with our financial resolutions and can be contacted here.

 

The advice provided in this blog is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. For our full disclaimer, please click here.